About Us

The Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (CNETS) India was established in 2013 by a group of healthcare professionals dedicated to advancing the field of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease management.

We have both professional and patient advocacy wings to connect with both NET specialists as well as patients in the Indian subcontinent.

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Carcinoid and neuroendocrine disease is a rare cancer affecting less than 5 in 100,000 persons.
 
Carcinoid cancer and related neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are small, slow growing tumors found mostly in the gastrointestinal system and other parts of the body such as the pancreas and the lung. These are slow growing tumors compared to other cancers and it usually takes many years before they become large or cause symptoms.
 
Carcinoid tumors and other NETs usually originate in the endocrine or hormone-producing cells in endocrine organs like the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, testes, ovaries or lungs. Carcinoid tumors can produce symptoms due to excess production of hormone substances, such as serotonin, bradykinin, histamine, and prostaglandins. Excess levels of these substances can sometimes result in a diverse set of symptoms called carcinoid syndrome

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3 days ago

Indian Neuroendocrine Tumor Forum

Never forget. Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls. #LetsTalkAboutNETs ... See MoreSee Less

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6 days ago

Indian Neuroendocrine Tumor Forum

A beautiful reminder that cancer is just a part of life, it does not define life. There is much more to love about Life and yourself.“I knew immediately. I get a breast exam every year, so I know what normal is supposed to look like. I could see the tumor on the screen. It was messy. It was black. But I didn’t feel shocked. I was calm. My surgery was scheduled for Valentine’s Day. And you know what? That was the most beautiful Valentine’s Day of my life. Because I spent it taking care of myself. I had a difficult childhood. Then I had a very hard love story that lasted for twenty years. And when that came to an end, I escaped into my work. I was like a hamster in a wheel: faster, faster, faster. It was easy to rationalize because I work in Women’s Rights. I felt involved in something bigger than myself. But I just wrote reports about the situation. Honestly I changed myself much more than the country. I was worn down. I had no free time. And my children are grown, so I was wondering if I had any reason to live anymore. Then four months ago the cancer came. It was a blessing in a shitty package. It was something I couldn’t control. And I was forced to accept that. Right now I’m not doing anything. I’m visiting with friends. I’m taking time to relax. I’m feeling grateful. And I’m asking myself big questions: ‘Where would I like to live?’ ‘What would I like to do?’ Questions I never had the time to ask. But most importantly I’m taking care of myself. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m late for my massage appointment.”

(Paris, France)
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2 weeks ago

Indian Neuroendocrine Tumor Forum
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